Rose’s Death Certificate

Rose’s Death Certificate

The procedure for Sam’s Death certificate is exactly the same for Rosie’s, since they both died in Allegheny County.

In other news, I just found out the Rosie was nor born in Naso, it was a different city, so I’ll have to do some sleuth work to figure out the details, but I’ll be out of the country for the next week and change. It’d be nice to enter France on my Italian passport, and will happen soon enough!

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Requesting Sam’s Death Certificate

Requesting Sam’s Death Certificate

I have sent a request to obtain copies of Salvatore’s (Sam’s) death certificate. He died in Maryland (even though he technically lived in West Virginia). As far as I know, death records are kept in the state where the deceased was pronounced dead, so if that happens to be in a different state than the residence, check the hospital’s location. This may not always hold true, since Ridgely, WV (Sam’s residence) is such a small town that practically all of it’s commerce and industry occurs in Cumberland, MD (my home town, also Sam’s death place).

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Search For Marriage Certificate

Search For Marriage Certificate

Having the original marriage certificate will be helpful in providing accurate and comprehensive data to the records office. A little Googling shows that Allegheny County Marriage Records are maintained by the Allegany County Circuit Court. Their address can be found here, and I’m assuming that equivalent websites exists for all US states. Google is proving invaluable in this process.

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Letter to the Consulate

Wanted to clarify a few questions, so I wrote this letter to an American Italian Consulate (Sent copies to many consulates, the first one to respond was the Miami consulate, they chose to use all-caps for some unidentifiable reason.)

Words in bold are replies by the Consulate.

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Domestic Documents Begin

Domestic Documents Begin

I’ve contacted a few of the book keepers in the family, and found that my Aunt Margie has Sam’s (Salvatore’s) Certificate of Naturalization, Sam’s Death certificate, and Sam/Rosie’s Marriage Certificate. There are originals in her hands, and I asked her to send me copies.

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The First Step

The First Step

…and probably the most difficult: Obtaining Italian Birth Records.

I decided that likely the most efficient way to handle the daunting dual-citizenship task would be to procure the hardest-to-find documents first. If I am going to have a insurmountable barrier, I’d rather hit it early before to much time and money has been invested. So I’m on a mission to get official copies of the birth certificates of both of my great-grandparents: Salvatore Sirna and Rose Marie Ridolfo Sirna.

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So, You Want To Be An Italian?

Well, I do! By blood, I am about 50% Italian. So when I first caught wind of the possibility to share citizenship between both the USA and Italy, I was interested to say the least.

A little background, why in the world would I go to the hassle?

Firstly, it’s a great backup plan! There is a lot of value in having the possibility to vacate the country for any reason. Some day, as American civil liberties get eroded away, tax increases compound, and America’s big-bully presence on the international stage gets more profound, it may end up being beneficial to announce a loud ‘to-hell-with-this’ and start a new life in Europe. (Sidenote: I’m not an anti-patriot, mutineer, traitor or all-around jerk. I remain only a skeptical man who likes to have options, plan B’s and exit plans. America still rocks!)

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